I started narrating for Bolinda in 1997.
BOLINDA AUDIO have been actively marketing their product overseas,
and reviews of Bolinda books have started appearing in a magazine
called " AudioFile - The AudioBook Review", based in Portland,ME USA.
This magazines has awards for excellence called 'Audiophiles's Earphones Award'

Titles Narrated for Bolinda Audio Books

Author:Arthur Upfield

Venom House - read review
Death of a Swagman - read review
Bushranger of the Skies - read review
The Devil's Steps - read review
An Author Bites the Dust - read review
The Bachelors of Broken Hill - read review
The Mystery of Swordfish Reef - Audiophiles Earphones Award winner - read review
The Will of the Tribe - read review
Boney and the White Savage
Clue of the New Shoe -
read review
Boney and the Black Virgin - read review
The Winds of Evil
The Sands of Windee
Wings Above the Diamantina
The Lake Frome Monster
The Bone is Pointed
Mr Jelly's Business
Murder Must Wait
The Widows of Broome
Death of a Lake
The Barrakee Mystery
The Mountains Have a Secret
The Battling Prophet
Man of Two Tribes
Boney and the Mouse
Madman's Bend

Author:Barry Maitland

Crucifixion Creek
Ash Island

Author: Peter Corris

The Reward - read review
The Washington Club - read review
Gun Control
Wet Graves
The Black Prince
The Other Side of Sorrow
Beware of the Dog
Lugarno - read review
Salt and Blood - read review

 

Author:Terry Burstall

The Soldier's Story
A Soldier Returns

Also:

On Our Selection by Steele Rudd
Cloud Street by Tim Winton - Audiophiles Earphones Award winner - read review
Jackson's Track by Daryl Tonkin & Carolyn Landon
Why Weren't We Told by Henry Reynolds
Black Horse Odyssey by David Harris
Cathy Freeman - A Journey Just Begun by Adrain McGregor
The Wild One by Damian Johnstone
Shoot Straight You Bastards! by Nick Blyzinski
Some Days Are Diamonds by Max Moore
The Slapping Man by Andrew Lindsay - read review
Fat, Fifty and F***ed by Geoffrey McGeachin
D.E.D. Dead by Geoffrey McGeachin - read review
D.E.D. and Kicking by Geoffrey McGeachinread review
Sensitive New Age Spy by Geoffrey McGeachin - read review
The Broken Shore by Peter Temple - read review
When We Have Wings by Claire Corbett - read review
Black Wattle Creek by Geoffrey McGeachin
The Mailman of the Birdsville Track by Kristin Weidenbach


 


THE REWARD

Peter Corris
ISIS/Bolinda Audio, 1999 / 5.5 hrs. / Mystery & Suspense Unabridged

Peter Hoskins sounds rough enough and shrewd enough to be convincing as no-nonsense private detective Cliff Hardy. Hoskins also projects an understated charm, which allows Hardy credibility as the moderately well-rounded tough guy he's supposed to be. Hardy recycles wastepaper and protests the overdevelopment of coastal Australia, yet Hoskins's tone also projects the character's familiarity with violence, sex and the dark side of Sydney. The plot moves swiftly, and Hoskins wisely counters with an unhurried passage through it. New rumors about a suppressed ransom note point to possible police or family involvement in a woman's disappearance 17 years earlier. Can Hardy afford the reward?
D.J. © AudioFile 2000, Portland, Maine [Published: APR/MAY 00]

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THE WASHINGTON CLUB

Peter Corris
Bolinda Audio, 1999 / 6 hrs. / Mystery & Suspense Unabridged

Cliff Hardy, a down-at-the-heels private investigator in Sydney, Australia, faces daunting challenges in this hard-boiled detective story. When he takes on a case for longtime friend and lawyer Sy Sackville, a series of events begins that leads him into attempts on his life, the death of a close friend, and a relationship with a murder suspect. Peter Hosking's narration fits perfectly with personalities and setting: His weary tone and cynical air speak volumes about the main character, and his rendition of the rest of the cast is subtle and complex. A clear and easily understood Australian accent brings the setting to life. M.A.M. © AudioFile, Portland, Maine [Published: FEB/MAR 00] ©2000 AudioFile Publications, Inc., All Rights Reserved

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VENOM HOUSE

Arthur W. Upfield
Bolinda/ Audio, 1999 / 7 hrs. / Mystery & Suspense Unabridged

Detective-Inspector Napoleon Bonaparte's crime-solving reputation is undisputed. He always gets his "man." But when Bonaparte finds himself at the Answerth's remote and foreboding family manor in the Australian outback, his search for a murderer becomes an ominous mission. Australian narrator Peter Hosking is a remarkably stalwart and capable reader; he has an indulgent interpretation of these peculiar characters-a stranger bunch you've yet to meet. The Answerth sisters, one prim and diabolical, the other fierce-tempered and aggressive, are vividly depicted as possible murder suspects. However, the idiot brother, kept under lock and key, displays glimpses of potential for the deed, as well. Hosking, as the detective-inspector, brilliantly guides the listener through a web of deceit, bizarre behaviors, and a side of Australia you may never have known.
B.J.P. © AudioFile 2000, Portland, Maine [Published: JUN/JUL 00]

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DEATH OF A SWAGMAN

Arthur W. Upfield
Bolinda Audio Books, 1999 / 7.5 hrs. / Mystery & Suspense Unabridged

Peter Hosking gives a good-natured reading to a down-under police procedural. Hosking's Australian accent helps the listener visualize the story of Inspector Napoleon Bonaparte, who takes only the impossible cases to crack. Half bushman, half-sophisticate, he gets himself arrested in the small town of Merino so that he can work the case from the inside. The production is technically clean, with varied music introducing and ending the sides.
One needs to pay attention because the foreignness of the story is hard to follow. This reviewer still doesn't know what a swagman is.
J.P.© AudioFile 2000, Portland, Maine [Published: AUG/SEPT 00]

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BUSHRANGER OF THE SKIES

Arthur W. Upfield
Bolinda Audio Books, 1999 / 7.75 hrs. / Mystery & Suspense Unabridged


Written and set in rural Australia in the 1930s, Bushranger features Upfield's serial detective Inspector Napoleon Bonaparte, whose task it is to stop murderous pilot Rex MacPherson from taking over his father's ranch. As Bonaparte dodges bombs and treks through miles of scrub, he is both helped and hindered by rival Aborigine tribes. Hosking has the requisite Aussie accent and the ability to differentiate characters as he narrates the story from dramatic opening to satisfying conclusion. Only the Aborigine pidgin seems demeaning in these politically correct times. Upfield admired the native Australians, but his condescending views led him to be banned from school curricula. Ironically, both the hero and villain here are half-castes.
J.B.G.© AudioFile 2000, Portland, Maine [Published: AUG/SEPT 00]

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THE SLAPPING MAN

Andrew Lindsay

When I read The Slapping Man I liked it a lot as an example of Inversion - the world we know turned not just upside down , but sideways and slant-ways too - it attracted me and revolted me. And it was funny. But I didn't remember it being particularly confronting. This changed while listening to this audio version. Being read aloud the text seems much more graphic, in both content and language, than it did when I read the book. I was quite squeamish listening to it and often I had to turn it off, or down, particularly when anyone under the age of 18 walked into the room. This is not to say that I didn't like the audio version of The Slapping Man, rather that I didn't quite recognise it. What was likeable about the recording was Peter Hosking's sane and sober treatment of it. I was thinking, considering the content, that there would be lots of voice characterisation, dotty renditions of the surreal characters of the novel. Initially I was disappointed at how his reading resisted this, but eventually I was impressed by it because the content is already so frenetic. I liked this presentation of The Slapping Man but I would warn listeners that the content and language is explicit.
Reviewer: Annalise Balsamo is an assistant editor of Labour and Industry.
3 stars
This review appeared in 'Australian Bookseller and Publisher' September 2004

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CLOUDSTREET

Tim Winton

With sensitivity and vision, novelist Tim Winton creates an Australian classic that takes the listener into the world of two wholly believable working-class families in post-WWII Perth. The Pickles family inherits, but cannot afford to keep, Cloudstreet, a rambling, ramshackled house - so they take in the Lambs as their boarders. The Pickles are an irreligious, indolent lot, while the Lambs are pious and hard-working. Peter Hosking's performance is true to Winton's unsentimental exploration into humankind's ability to love and survive amid adversity. Hosking handles the mundane and the mystical with equal assurance. His characterisations, including an aboriginal ghost and a talking pig are earthy, real, and frequently hilarious. Hosking makes the most of Winton's honesty, wit, and original imagery. S.J.H.
AudioFile Magazine, Oct/Nov 2004

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THE MYSTERY OF SWORDFISH REEF

Arthur Upfield

Detective-Inspector Napoleon Bonaparte is back to solve a seeningly impossible mystery. Three men set off for a day of swordfishing never to return, leaving not a trace, until a tuna trawler hauls in a head complete with a bullet hole. The famous tracker must search the ocean's ever-changing face to find the murderers. Partially aboriginal, Bony is considered by some to be a savage, so he creates himself as the most gentlemanly of gentlemen. Peter Hosking animates the characters in this 1939 novel, bringing the richness and vastness of the Australian continent vividly to life. From distraught mother to suave and wicked murderer, Hosking enriches Upfield's characters with intonations ranging from heated thrill to deadly cold calculation. The variety and depth of characters in these mysteries still distinguish the series - that is, aside from its dashing, brilliant detective. B.H.B.
AudioFile Magazine, Aug/Sept 2004

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D-E-D DEAD

Geoffrey McGeachin

Listeners will love Alby Murdoch, photographer and secret agent for D.E.D., the Directorate for Extra-territorial Defence, an intelligence-gathering unit of the Australian government. Peter Hosking's performance creates an Alby who's a "dedhead" on a mission, escaping assassination attempts by the seat of his pants and commenting snidely on bureaucrats, love, and life while dodging exploding luggage and menacing gunmen. Hosking's portrayal of Alby offers listeners a wry sense of reality and a photographer's eye for beauty (McGeachin teaches photography in Sydney) as he travels from Melbourne to Sydney to Bali to Australia's Outback. Not quite as bumbling as Maxwell Smart or as urbane as James Bond, Hosking's Alby scores a direct, often hilarious, hit on the self-important stuffiness of the espionage business. S.J.H. © AudioFile 2007, Portland, Maine [Published: JUN/ JUL 07]

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LUGARNO

Peter Corris

Despite his hard-boiled exterior, Private Investigator Cliff Hardy has a moral center. Aging, laid-back, a survivor with the scars to show it, he's quit smoking and cut back on--but not given up--alcohol. In LUGARNO, a posh suburb of Sydney, Hardy finds himself embroiled in drugs, blackmail, murder, and a male escort service supplying wealthy Australian housewives with some naughty diversions. Peter Hosking's excellent narration highlights Hardy's running commentary on post-Olympics Sydney; his botched relationships with women; and his good-natured, if self-deprecating, personal assessments. In the style of American crime noir masters Ross Macdonald and Raymond Chandler, Corris creates a voice that is rough, brawling, occasionally tender, and distinctly Australian. Hosking's narration of that signature voice rings with wit and truth. S.J.H. (c) AudioFile 2004, Portland, Maine [Published: JUN/ JUL 04]

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THE CLUE OF THE NEW SHOE

Arthur W. Upfield

Inspector Napoleon Bonaparte is the half-Aboriginal protagonist in Upfield's popular Australian mystery series. In this 1951 book, "Boney" is on special assignment to solve a murder in southeastern Australia. Peter Hosking does a good job bringing life to Bonaparte, who is supremely self-confident to the point of arrogance; pedantic; ingratiating to some and insufferable to others; and to modern ears, a racist. Hosking, who is Australian, does as well with the many other characters. He perfectly uses the tight vowels of Australian whites and the gentler speech of the Aboriginals, and his females are as believable as his males. This is a well-paced, involving reading of a dated book. R.E.K. © AudioFile 2006, Portland, Maine [Published: APR/ MAY 06]

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THE BACHELORS OF BROKEN HILL

Arthur W. Upfield

Arthur W. Upfield wrote many detective novels featuring Detective Inspector Napoleon Bonaparte--Boney--born of a European father and an Aboriginal mother. They are stylized portrayals of the perpetual outsider, a man who succeeds in a race-conscious hierarchical organization because he never fails to solve the crime that confronts him. In this story, Boney is loaned by the Queensland CID to solve a series of poisonings in Broken Hill, a famous mining town in New South Wales. Peter Hosking's Australian accent, though strong, is always understandable to American ears. Hosking gives Boney a flippant, superior vocal characterization that pinpoints his personality. Not all of the other characters receive such clear characterization. The listener usually knows who is speaking from the context, though not always by the voice. These lapses do not detract from the pleasures of listening to this "Australian Poirot" in action. R.E.K. © AudioFile 2001, Portland, Maine [Published: JUN/JUL 01]

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SENSITIVE NEW AGE SPY

Geoff McGeachin

Author Geoff McGeachin's popular thriller/farce series features Special Agent Alby Murdoch, who finds himself in the thick of a deadly situation in Sydney, Australia, when all he wants to do is relax. Part James Bond, part Pink Panther, Alby blunders his way through this hilarious action-packed adventure. Australian narrator Peter Hosking gives Alby life in an inspired reading that is so infectious listeners will be begging for more. Hosking reads as if he's not reading at all, speaking to listeners in a straightforward and self-deprecating manner as he dives into character and becomes Alby Murdoch with the greatest of ease. L.B. © AudioFile 2008, Portland, Maine [Published: DECEMBER 2008]

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THE WILL OF THE TRIBE

Arthur Upfield

THE WILL OF THE TRIBE skillfully presents a "locked-door mystery"-a plot device beloved by fans of detective stories. Peter Hosking's narration is the perfect vehicle. Upfield's Inspector Napoleon Bonaparte mysteries are renowned for their reproduction of the dialogue, lifestyles, and attitudes of 1930s Australians. Inspector Bonaparte is part white, part aborigine-a helpful combination in this case as a dead white man is found in an Outback crater, with no clue as to how he got there and no witnesses. Hosking navigates male and female, white and aboriginal, young and old voices with the ease of a bounding kangaroo. He pulls off these vocal acrobatics with masterful aplomb. M.L.K. © AudioFile 2009, Portland, Maine [Published: JULY 2009]

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THE DEVIL'S STEPS

Arthur Upfield

Arthur Upfield's thirty-year-old series about Detective Inspector Napoleon Bonaparte of the Australian police is being reissued, and its politically incorrect aspects can be a bit jarring in 2009. Nevertheless, Bony remains a fascinating, if improbable, character, and narrator Peter Hosking has a wonderful time with him and other in the very large cast. Our protagonist is on special assignment at a posh mountain resort. His job is to sniff out who possesses German plans secreted out of Europe after WWII. Murder intervenes. We have every accent to be found in Australia, every social class, and sober and drunk versions of both men and women. Hosking handles it all very well, only occasionally getting carried away by the exuberant opportunity. But over-the-top is as it should be. R.E.K. © AudioFile 2009, Portland, Maine [Published: JUNE 2009]

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DEAD AND KICKING

Geoffrey McGeachin

In McGeachin's series, Alby Murdoch works for the DED, the Directorate for Extra-Territorial Defence of the government of Australia. As Murdoch is working his current freelance gig in Vietnam, where he's making a film about the war, he sights men who were declared dead in the war. En route, Murdoch's penchant for Asian foods has narrator Peter Hosking deftly moving from the hero's rapture over purple basil to his quick-thinking evasion of his own assassination. The story's diverse elements seem incongruous until the plot turns to a potentially fatal fish industry, launched with a vengeance by evildoers and halted by Murdoch, who is assisted by a sexy sharp-shooting Vietnamese detective. Hosking is best at Murdoch's wry Aussie voice, and he also manages the accents of Asians-friends and thugs-and an American politician. However, he goes from salacious to shrill with an oversexed food celebrity who is an enthusiastic fan of the ironic Aussie James Bond. D.P.D. © AudioFile 2010, Portland, Maine [Published: FEBRUARY 2010]

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BONEY AND THE BLACK VIRGIN

Arthur Upfield

The harsh Australian Outback is the dramatic setting for Detective Inspector Napoleon Bonaparte's (Bony) latest case. In a distant, desolate sheep station, two men have been brutally murdered, and Bony is just the sleuth for the job. He is half Aborigine and uses his deep understanding of the land, the people, and the country's strange and unusual flora and fauna as he finds minute, seemingly insignificant, evidence buried in the dusty soil. This communion with nature in Upfield's vivid imagery, paired with colorful idioms, often leads to the most telling of clues. Peter Hosking's performance reflects the harsh Outback with his melodious Australian accent, overlayed by gruff, husky expression. One can almost hear the parched essence of the backcountry drought in his crackled speech. A.W. © AudioFile 2011, Portland, Maine [Published: JANUARY 2011]

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AN AUTHOR BITES THE DUST

Arthur Upfield

The delightfully eccentric Detective Inspector Napoleon Bonaparte pretends to be a South African author to investigate the murder of a prominent Australian writer. There are minimal clues, a situation that makes the challenge he faces that much greater. Narrator Peter Hosking cheerfully presents humor and gravity in a variety of Australia's accents in a most appealing conversational style. A cat called Mr. Pickwick assists Napoleon with examining ping-pong balls filled with coffin dust. As the tragic causes of the murder are revealed, 1930s-1950s Australia and its attitudes towards Aborigines and women are revealed. This fascinating entry is part of Bolinda's Napoleon Bonaparte series. S.G.B. © AudioFile 2009, Portland, Maine [Published: JULY 2009]

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THE BROKEN SHORE

Peter Temple

Journalist Peter Temple's novels have won five of Australia's prestigious Ned Kelly Awards for crime fiction. THE BROKEN SHORE makes it easy to see why. Melbourne Homicide Detective Joe Cashin is recovering in his hometown, Port Monro, where it soon becomes apparent that big cities aren't the only places big crimes occur. Peter Hosking handles the rough-and-tumble characters as easily as the more subtle ones. Child pornography, racism, sexual abuse, political intricacies, and Cashin's personal problems all contribute to Temple's sophisticated plot and allow Hosking's performance to bring a host of truthful characters to light. There can be little doubt that this is an Australian original--earthy, raw, and savage, yet as breathtaking and surprising as the country itself. S.J.H. © AudioFile 2007, Portland, Maine [Published: OCT/ NOV 07]

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SALT AND BLOOD

Peter Corris

In SALT AND BLOOD, Peter Hosking demonstrates the importance of a good narrator. Corris's novel is generally entertaining, and the dialogue is good at times, but the story remains a bit of a stretch. Policewoman turned private investigator Glen Withers, reunited with her ex-lover, is hired to deal with the case of Rodney St. John Harkness, an alcoholic recently released from a mental hospital who may have a heinous past. Overcoming some long-winded passages, Hosking brings life to the story and keeps the pace brisk. Just as the right ingredients can transform a mediocre recipe into a culinary masterpiece, Hosking's style takes a good book and makes it a far better listening experience. D.J.S. © AudioFile 2008, Portland, Maine [Published: APR/ MAY 08]

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WHEN WE HAVE WINGS

Claire Corbett

In this slightly futuristic world, there's a class divide between rich fliers, with genetically engineered attached wings, and wretchedly poor non-fliers. Peter Hosking does an excellent job clearly differentiating between the two main characters. Zeke, the traditional noir cop turned cynical private eye, is trying to track down a young nanny who has stolen her charge. Hosking expertly projects Zeke's confusion and shifting emotions as he uncovers the young woman's true story. In addition, Hosking effectively projects Zeke's uncertainty about whether or not he should get his own son wings in a system full of corruption. This is a detail-rich story, and Hosking's clear, lilting voice, with its slight Australian accent, is a true pleasure. S.M. [Published: JANUARY 2013]

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